Making Pasta: A Photo Essay

You hear me talking about Romagna and its food a lot on this blog. I talked about the salt, strozzapreti, Formaggio di Fossa, piadina, but I never presented a general overview of Romagna’s food.

as it often happens in Italy, Romagna food is characterized by its history. Originally a marsh land, this area of Italy was a poverty-stricken land. My grandparents came from mezzadri families- people who’d be allowed to cultivate the master’s land in exchange for what they needed to survive, and nothing more. Their parents before them and their grandparents were in the same conditions, and it was a huge leap forward when, in the years after World War 2, they could start their own entrepreneurial business serving food and coffee to the neighborhood families. So, food is still revered as the most precious belonging, and as children we were taught to only put on our plate what we needed, never to waste food, and to eat leftovers when there were any!

The cuisine in Romagna still follows the same principles of the years before the war: everything is made from scratch because it’s cheaper than to buy premade. Whatever is fresh at the market is what is served at the table. And leftovers are made in creative and wonderful dishes!

Making pasta from scratch is then a must in Romagna!

Starting steps: flour, eggs and a pinch of salt!

Starting steps: Flour, eggs and a pinch of salt!

Using gravity to help with dough rolling

Using gravity to help with dough rolling!

Traditional egg pasta dough being folded for Tagliatelle

Traditional egg pasta dough being folded for tagliatelle

Eggless pasta sheets cut out to make strozzapreti

Eggless pasta sheets cut out to make strozzapreti

Pasta filling: boiled and chopped chards mixed with ricotta cheese and a hint of nutmeg

Pasta filling: boiled and chopped chard mixed with ricotta cheese and a hint of nutmeg

Ravioli being made: the filling is ready and the dough is getting moisten

Ravioli being made: the filling is ready and the dough is getting moisten

The cutting of ravioli

Cutting ravioli!

Ravioli are ready!

Ravioli are (almost) ready. Now on with the cooking!

Now ravioli are ready!

Now they’re ready!

Tagliatelle ai frutti di mare

Tagliatelle ai frutti di mare

Strozzapreti al Pomodoro

Strozzapreti al pomodoro.

10 Responses to “Making Pasta: A Photo Essay”

  1. I love this post… such amazing photos. Thank you so much for sharing (and making me super hungry!)

  2. Oh, I’m drooling. That all looks so good!

    +Jessie
    a.k.a. The Hungry Mouse

  3. oh thats a great post !

  4. Yum! That looks so delicious.

  5. mio dio!

  6. Check out my latest post – involves you!

  7. Wow, homemade pasta. Looks simply delicious.

  8. Ok – Why is that egg yolk more orangy looking? Different chicken? I remember as a child back in Romania our free-range (as they are called today) chicken eggs sometimes having one of those very orange colored yolks.

    Great tip about using gravity! I usually make mine with the pasta machine :-)

    Great pics and post! Thanks

    Cheers!
    Gabi @ Mamaliga.com

  9. Ciao Gabi,

    I think it’s only different feed for the chicken that accounts for the different colors. Organic free range brown eggs tend to be more similar in color even here! On the pasta machine… everyone says that, but I challenge you to try the rolling pin: it’s actually faster (and also more fun!).
    Ciao!
    Vanessa

  10. Thanks Vanessa!

    My only fear of the rolling pin method is that the rolled dough will rip apart. Can you do a video on how to roll it? Any science that goes with it? I see you are mentioning the gravity trick. Any tips to share?

    Thanks a ton! Love your blog!

    Cheers!
    Gabi @ Mamaliga.com

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